April 28, 2014
The Medical Chronicles Vol. 3 Issue …

Guess what’s finally here! Yup, the Winter print issue of The Medical Chronicles. Better late than never, right? In order for me to get the publications out on time, I need your help too! Send your submissions on time, and spread the word. The Summer issue will be coming out sometime in August. In order to have your work printed in the next issue, send your submissions by June 14.

This issue contains work by cranquis, baffledinbrooklyn, docedace, theclashbetweentwoprincesses, clumsy-medic, and more! Check it out, spread the word, and send your own work!

Send me an email at themedicalchronicles@gmail.com (and if you are one of the contributors, I will send you a .pdf version).

February 2, 2014

modernathena90 said: New here! How do I submit?

1) Welcome, welcome! :)

2) You can submit via the submit box, or email to themedicalchronicles@gmail.com

3) Spread the word!

December 3, 2013
What Makes Us Alike

A taste of what’s coming up in the next issue of The Medical Chronicles.  Reminder, you now have about a week until the deadline - December 11 (it can be extended a bit to Dec. 15, but that’s the latest, please).

Clumsy Medic submitted:

In his blog piece “Remember Why We Came,” Rick Pescatore, a medical student at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, writes:

To some degree, depression and exhaustion are an almost expected result of the medical school journey. With constant pressure to pass exams, excel amongst the most talented of peers, and develop oneself as a competent future clinician, medical students often report alarming rates of dysthymia and depression. Anxiety during The Match, worry over board exams, and apprehension about one’s place in the crush of clinical academia become the constant progression, and students’ angst and unhappiness come to define their days.

When I am supposed to be cramming for all the exams that are drawing awefully close, I am reading this piece instead because I too am spending most of my free time worrying about where I will be in a year and a half. Will I even be able to make it, will I make a good doctor, do I even have what it takes?

All these worries haunt me. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night with a feeling of hopelessness that’s impossible to push away. Other times, I tell myself that I am going to do whatever it takes, even if it kills me. And that does almost literally, kill me until I go into a low where I don’t do anything for days and just worry.

There’s another way, though. Hidden beneath the stacks of library books, nestled between the rooms of patients tucked away and stable for the night, we find the reasons we came to medical school:  The older gentleman who shares amazing stories with you in the dead of your third call night in a row. The sick kid we’re able to make a difference for. The ailing individual who, returning from their darkest moments, brings you the brightest of yours.

I could have written the same thing but in different words:

And yes, I woke up at 3 in the morning trying to get some studying done and yes, when I enter the clinic at 8 AM it’s already been 5 hours since I woke up and I would love to just get to bed and never get out. But then I sit in my chair and this kid walks in holding his mother’s hand and smiles at me shyly. We chat about his school and his friends. When I take him in for a physical, he gets all quiet and scared. But then I tickle his tummy and start talking to him again and he starts giggling and telling me all about his day like we are long lost friends. And I forget that I am so exhausted or that I would kill for a cup of coffee, but can’t get one because of all the panic attacks, or that I am going to have to kill myself again when I get home, trying to study. At that moment, all I can feel is happiness.

The thing is, no matter what words we use to say it, at the end of the day, we all say it. We complain about the insane amount of work. Hell, there have been moments when I have (almost) seriously considered quitting. But most of us usually turn back. And we do that because deep inside, somewhere, we all know that we wouldn’t be able to live without the joy that fills us when we have been able to do something for a patient.

I think that’s what’s so incredible about being a medic—the community. No matter where we are and no matter how we are doing it, when you tell another medic that you go to med school too, they will smile that half-sympathrtic-half-understanding smile. We don’t need to explain to each other what we are going through. And I think the community acts as a support system like no other; when I am going insane, I come across a blog post of a fellow medic complaining about my problems and the feeling of hopelessness and it makes me feel less hopeless because I know that I’m not alone. Or I read a piece like this one which reminds me why I started this journey in the first place. 

That’s why I think it’s so important to write, because what may seem like thoughtless rambling to you may help someone else in your place to make it through the day. Because no matter how bad a place one is in, one is never there on their own. There is always someone who has been there and made it through. And that knowledge somehow makes it easier.

I want to thank every medblr/blogger out there, anon or otherwise for writing, sharing their experiences, their miseries,and motivating those in need. I honestly don’t know how they did it in the pre-Tumblr/Blogspot/internet era.

 

November 29, 2013
Call for Submissions!

themedicalchronicles:

themedicalchronicles:

I interrupt your daily posts with another semi-nonsense one. As always, I was thinking and daydreaming, and thought, how awesome would it be if somehow Tom Hiddleston submitted a piece of work to The Medical Chronicles? I mean he’s into charity, and he can sing, dance, act, quote poetry/literature, so perhaps he does some writing himself! Or even draws.

While organizing our Fundraiser Talent Show, a group member once joked that I need celebrity endorsement in order to get a large attendance - but jeez imagine if he did submit, sales on the print copy for that issue of The Medical Chronicles would go off the charts! And I could donate all that money to Doctors Without Borders!

…yeah ok. Anyway, all of you are always welcome to submit (and then you can direct your friends and family to buying the magazine for a good cause), and remember that the deadline for the next issue is December 11.

Reminder: you now have one month until the submission deadline! The Medical Chronicles Volume 3 Issue 1 is coming out near the end of December. Send your work via the submit page or via email to themedicalchronicles@gmail.com. Make sure to include whether you’d like to stay anonymous and use your Tumblr name, or would like to use your real name (and I of course do not bite nor give away identities).

The magazine is open to all works - writing, illustrations, etc that you feel falls at the intersection of medicine and the humanities.

Some of your favorite Tumblrs that have previously “jumped off this bridge" include Dr. Cranquis, Dr. Baffled, Wayfaring MD, md-admissions, aspiringdoctors, and others!

(via davepress)

November 10, 2013
Call for Submissions!

themedicalchronicles:

I interrupt your daily posts with another semi-nonsense one. As always, I was thinking and daydreaming, and thought, how awesome would it be if somehow Tom Hiddleston submitted a piece of work to The Medical Chronicles? I mean he’s into charity, and he can sing, dance, act, quote poetry/literature, so perhaps he does some writing himself! Or even draws.

While organizing our Fundraiser Talent Show, a group member once joked that I need celebrity endorsement in order to get a large attendance - but jeez imagine if he did submit, sales on the print copy for that issue of The Medical Chronicles would go off the charts! And I could donate all that money to Doctors Without Borders!

…yeah ok. Anyway, all of you are always welcome to submit (and then you can direct your friends and family to buying the magazine for a good cause), and remember that the deadline for the next issue is December 11.

Reminder: you now have one month until the submission deadline! The Medical Chronicles Volume 3 Issue 1 is coming out near the end of December. Send your work via the submit page or via email to themedicalchronicles@gmail.com. Make sure to include whether you’d like to stay anonymous and use your Tumblr name, or would like to use your real name (and I of course do not bite nor give away identities).

The magazine is open to all works - writing, illustrations, etc that you feel falls at the intersection of medicine and the humanities.

Some of your favorite Tumblrs that have previously “jumped off this bridge" include Dr. Cranquis, Dr. Baffled, Wayfaring MD, md-admissions, aspiringdoctors, and others!

October 20, 2013

I interrupt your daily posts with another semi-nonsense one. As always, I was thinking and daydreaming, and thought, how awesome would it be if somehow Tom Hiddleston submitted a piece of work to The Medical Chronicles? I mean he’s into charity, and he can sing, dance, act, quote poetry/literature, so perhaps he does some writing himself! Or even draws.

While organizing our Fundraiser Talent Show, a group member once joked that I need celebrity endorsement in order to get a large attendance - but jeez imagine if he did submit, sales on the print copy for that issue of The Medical Chronicles would go off the charts! And I could donate all that money to Doctors Without Borders!

…yeah ok. Anyway, all of you are always welcome to submit (and then you can direct your friends and family to buying the magazine for a good cause), and remember that the deadline for the next issue is December 11.

October 13, 2013
The Medical Chronicles Vol. 2 Issue 2

There you go! Let’s pretend this actually came out in May 2013 :)

Remember, these magazines only work with you lovely folks, so send your work! You have about 2 months until the next submission deadline (Dec 11), so get those creative neurons firing.

April 17, 2013
I can’t seem to reblog myself (is Missing E not working?) so I’ve reposted this flyer. If you’re in NYC or happen to be in the area next Tuesday April 23, drop by for our fundraiser-Talent Show (I’m also still looking for a few more performers!)
And a reminder that submissions are due this Friday! Submit now for the print issue,  or hold your peace ‘til next Fall.

I can’t seem to reblog myself (is Missing E not working?) so I’ve reposted this flyer. If you’re in NYC or happen to be in the area next Tuesday April 23, drop by for our fundraiser-Talent Show (I’m also still looking for a few more performers!)

And a reminder that submissions are due this Friday! Submit now for the print issue,  or hold your peace ‘til next Fall.

March 13, 2013
Exactly what it says on the flyer :)
And submissions for the next print issue is due April 19!

Exactly what it says on the flyer :)

And submissions for the next print issue is due April 19!

December 26, 2012
The Medical Chronicles Vol 2 Issue 1

The issue is ready, folks! You can buy a .pdf for only $2 or buy a print for $5 and get a .pdf free! (Those of you who already submitted work will be getting a print version mailed from me, and I can email you the .pdf for free, if you want).

Proceeds for this issue will be donated to Sandy Relief!

November 15, 2012
Submissions are Due by November 16 for Volume 2 Issue 1

themedicalchronicles:

If you would like your work featured in the print issue of The Medical Chronicles coming out in December, send in your work by Friday November 16, 11:59 P.M.

Previous issues have included work from Cranquis and Dr. Baffled, and the issue coming up will have a piece from Wayfaring MD.

So let’s get those submissions rolling!

Ahem, ahem! Reminder that the deadline is tomorrow! Speak now or hold your peace ‘til May!

November 5, 2012
Submissions are Due by November 16 for Volume 2 Issue 1

If you would like your work featured in the print issue of The Medical Chronicles coming out in December, send in your work by Friday November 16, 11:59 P.M.

Previous issues have included work from Cranquis and Dr. Baffled, and the issue coming up will have a piece from Wayfaring MD.

So let’s get those submissions rolling!

July 11, 2012
The Medical Chronicles Catalogued

The Medical Chronicles is now officially a part of the Brooklyn College Library Catalog!

You can check out our magazine, and the other zines at the library’s website.

The zine collection at BC also has it’s own website that you can check out here.

You are also cordially invited to the opening ceremony of the zine collection, Fold, Staple, Share: Highlights from the Brooklyn College Library Zine Collection!

The celebration is to include zine readings and an exhibition.

Place: Brooklyn College Library’s Christoph M. Kimmich Reading Room (1st floor)

Time: July 31, 2012 7-9pm

Brooklyn, NY — In celebration of the newly-established Brooklyn College Library Zine Collection, an opening celebration will be held on Tuesday, July 31 from 7:00pm to 9:00pm, in Brooklyn College Library’s Christoph M. Kimmich Reading Room (1st floor). The event, which is open to the public, will feature zine readings, refreshments, an exhibition, and will represent the official unveiling of the browsing collection.

Zines (a contraction of “magazines”) are independent publications often authored/assembled by an individual or small group, reproduced on a photocopier, and distributed inexpensively in small runs, or traded from person to person. Zine collections are increasingly being established by librarians and archivists in an effort to include underrepresented perspectives and unique points of view in library collections.

The exhibition, entitled Fold, Staple, Share: Highlights from the Brooklyn College Library Zine Collection, will run throughout the summer and fall semesters and will spotlight notable zines from the collection, as well as information about zine-making and zine culture.

The reading on July 31 will feature local Brooklyn zinesters Kate Angell, Elvis Bakaitis, Tommy Pico, and Kate Wadkins, as well as Brooklyn College students Afrah Ahmed, Emma Karin Eriksson, and Tzirel Norman, among others.

The Brooklyn College Library Zine Collection specializes in zines that relate to Brooklyn, zines by Brooklyn College students and alumni, zines about zines, and other zines that relate to the student body and curriculum of Brooklyn College. The Zine Collection was founded in 2011 by Alycia Sellie, Media and Cultural Studies Librarian at Brooklyn College Library, with assistance from two cohorts of summer zine interns: Devon Nevola and Robin Potter (2011), and Sarah Rappo and Erica Saunders (2012). Whenever possible, two copies of each zine are collected: one will be in the open browsing collection, accessible whenever the library is open; the other will be placed in Special Collections at the library, accessible by appointment.


May 7, 2012
Volume 1 Issue 2 Is Ready!

Volume 1 Issue 2 of The Medical Chronicles print magazine is now available.

This issue features the work of Dr. Cranquis, Dr. Baffled, LupineLady, and more!

Download your free digital copy here. You can also order the print version for only $4 - although right now HP is having a Spring sale, so you can buy it for $3. (I wanted to make the print issue free also, but you’re basically just paying for the printing cost).

I can mail out a few issues to those of you who might be interested. Let me know.

Hope you enjoy! And as always, the ask/submit box is open for your work to be featured too.

March 16, 2012
Narrative Medicine Night at Brooklyn College

                                                     By Rummanu Yeasin

The Medical Chronicles hosted Narrative Medicine night on Thursday March 15 from 5-7 p.m. in the Women’s Center.

The night consisted of three guest speakers, Jennifer Sotsky, Lisa Roth, and Jocelyn Jiao, who led a discussion about narrative medicine.

Sotsky has an MS in Narrative Medicine from Columbia University, and has been teaching narrative medicine to post-bacc students at Columbia and Dartmouth University. The Narrative Medicine program at Columbia is relatively new, and according to the program website, students will “learn the skills of narrative competence and master the leadership required to develop and implement narrative-based learning and practice in clinical settings.”

Jiao has a master’s degree in narrative medicine also. She is currently a first year medical student at Mt. Sinai. As a painter, she did her MS capstone project in an intensive oil painting summer course in London with the Slade School of Fine Arts.

Roth is a third year medical student at Columbia, and has an MA in English. She did a summer fellowship with Narrative Medicine and NIH funds in the British Museum in London on the depiction of neurological diseases in Victorian literature.  

The attendees of the event consisted of undergrad and graduate students who were mostly Biology and English majors. They all sat around tables facing each other to discuss various aspects of how medicine and literature are connected. First Sotsky and Jiao discussed their experiences in the Narrative Medicine program, and then Roth spoke about how she uses narrative medicine in her clinical rotations.

“You can be a humanist outside of the library,” says Roth.

To many, it seems that empathy should come natural to a doctor – that they should also learn how to deal with patients in pre-med classes and in medical school. But such humanities courses are rarely taught. Roth believes in narrative medicine, and says that she is able to see her patients differently through her education in literature. She can view her patients almost as characters, and because of her learning through close reading, she can ask questions like why a patient uses a certain word, or why a patient is acting oddly.  

The group then did an exercise Sotsky usually does with her students. She gave out the poem “Days” by Philip Larkin and asked two students to read the poem aloud. Everyone then did a close reading of the poem and later discussed the various words that struck each person, and analyzed what the role of the doctor could have been in the poem.

Jiao further spoke about abstract art, and why it interests her so much. She says that there is “something about abstract art that is dangerous and thrilling – like searching for the key to a secret garden or simply getting to know someone who is careful and reticent.”

The Narrative Medicine program at Columbia is not only for physicians or future physicians. Many who are accepted into the program mold their own paths, and are already, or can become, nurses, medical journalists and writers who better understand patients, and medical narratives.

All three speakers agreed that studying the arts gives them a different perspective on learning about medicine. They agree that the sciences are of course important, and one must have a strong hold in the sciences to go to medical school, but classes in the humanities can also help in thinking critically and analyzing problems from different and more sympathetic perspectives.

“It was a very intellectual discussion,” says Yasemin Kaynas, a Senior Biology major. “It was great to see how we can incorporate humanities in our everyday lives, especially in science. It can be done! Science doesn’t have to be only science.”

The Medical Chronicles is a club that was started in the Fall semester by Rummanu Yeasin, a master’s candidate in English. The club seeks to intertwine medicine and the humanities and publishes print issues of their magazine in December and in April. The club also maintains an online magazine which can be read at themedicalchronicles.tumblr.com.

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