September 3, 2013

cranquis:

medicalstate:

An Emergency Physician’s Admission.

"If you actually show that you care about your health and listen to me or show me the slightest bit of respect I will bend over backwards to help you get better."

Yes — that’s a sign of a good doctor.

But a GREAT doctor will also give the uncooperative patients a glimpse of what they’re missing out on, and inspire them to strive for better health.

I am not always a great doctor, but on those occasions when I see a “difficult patient” slow down for a moment and really start to think about the health choices he/she can make — I feel amazing!

(via medicaljourney)

July 11, 2012
"I love science, and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awed by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and reinvigorate it."

Robert M. Sapolsky (via wonderwanderpolarbear)

Hmm. Seems that some people prefer to keep their old mysteries instead of solving them and discovering new ones - often embedded in the old ones!

(via realcleverscience)

(Source: magnificent--desolation, via thescienceofreality)

May 7, 2012
The Hidden Curriculum of Med School

“You can’t learn ethics or compassion. You either have it or you don’t.”

I’ve often thought of her statement in the years since. Is bedside manner something we are born with, or is it something we can learn?

While most of medical education and training is about the nuts and bolts of clinical care — how to treat hypertension, how to manage a ventilator, how to take out a gallbladder — the process also involves learning how to be “a doctor.” As opposed to lessons covered in textbooks and classrooms, this kind of learning is done through modeling, or what medical sociologist F. W. Hafferty has called the “informal” or “hidden curriculum.”

October 9, 2011
cranquis:

Hi there, Stephen — thanks for writing. I’m not sure which of the 2-3 questions in your post you’re wanting my opinion on? Since I’ve written a post before about physician-assisted suicide and my thoughts on interventions that focus on “prolonging life” above “improving quality-of-life” for terminal/poor-prognosis patients, I’m gonna just talk about my definition of compassion in this reply.
To me, Compassion is:
The Golden Rule in one word — Doing unto others as I would have them do unto me.
An integral part of what makes a person a person. People who cannot feel compassion are not living up to their potential as an intelligent being. One of the scariest things about a sociopath is his/her inability to demonstrate compassion and empathy.
One of the best clues to look for in another person, to tell you that they are worth spending time with (as a friend, romantic partner, boss, employee, etc).
The most effective sermon I can live. (“Preach the gospel at all times — if necessary, use words.” St Francis of Assisi)
Impossible to get reimbursed for in the healthcare system, yet probably the most valuable thing that a doctor can give to a suffering patient.
A very worthwhile organization that provides child-sponsorship programs around the world (I’ve been sponsoring a boy in India for the past 10 years, and it has been SO enriching to my life. Consider it as a way to exercise your compassion muscles and practice daily giving.)
Used liberally in the field of Palliative Medicine — I strongly encourage any future doctor with a tender heart to consider this as a future specialty!
***Pending Cranquis-Mails: 3; Ask Box: Closed***

cranquis:

Hi there, Stephen — thanks for writing. I’m not sure which of the 2-3 questions in your post you’re wanting my opinion on? Since I’ve written a post before about physician-assisted suicide and my thoughts on interventions that focus on “prolonging life” above “improving quality-of-life” for terminal/poor-prognosis patients, I’m gonna just talk about my definition of compassion in this reply.

To me, Compassion is:

  • The Golden Rule in one word — Doing unto others as I would have them do unto me.
  • An integral part of what makes a person a person. People who cannot feel compassion are not living up to their potential as an intelligent being. One of the scariest things about a sociopath is his/her inability to demonstrate compassion and empathy.
  • One of the best clues to look for in another person, to tell you that they are worth spending time with (as a friend, romantic partner, boss, employee, etc).
  • The most effective sermon I can live. (“Preach the gospel at all times — if necessary, use words.” St Francis of Assisi)
  • Impossible to get reimbursed for in the healthcare system, yet probably the most valuable thing that a doctor can give to a suffering patient.
  • A very worthwhile organization that provides child-sponsorship programs around the world (I’ve been sponsoring a boy in India for the past 10 years, and it has been SO enriching to my life. Consider it as a way to exercise your compassion muscles and practice daily giving.)
  • Used liberally in the field of Palliative Medicine — I strongly encourage any future doctor with a tender heart to consider this as a future specialty!

***Pending Cranquis-Mails: 3; Ask Box: Closed***

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