April 16, 2014

Anonymous asked: Hi! I'm so happy I stumbled upon this blog. Can you please tell me if choosing a different major other than a life sciences undergrad is really important? I mean do med schools really care about that? Do they like English majors? If you don't mind, where are you going for med school, what do you want to be, and what did you choose as your under grad major? Thank you!

Hi back at ya! I’m glad so glad you stumbled upon this blog too ;) Hope you enjoy it!

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Med schools like well-rounded applicants - so basically what’s important is choosing a major that you’re interested in. You can be an English major and still be on the pre-med track. I’ve answered most of these questions in this previous post.

I’m currently attending the University of Medicine and Health Sciences in St Kitts. The same school compoundfractur attends. I’d like to be a pediatrician and a writer of sorts. My undergrad major was Biology, and I did a minor in English. I also went to grad school for English Lit.

aspiringdoctors majored in the arts in undergrad. And if I remember correctly, I think baffledinbrooklyn had majored in something music related?

So go ahead, and pursue what you love! You can have your cake and eat it too the best of both worlds!

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April 16, 2014
Alright, irandommomentsdevida has posed an important question

ermedicine:

cranquis:

md-admissions:

That I cannot answer.

What actor do you see portraying me or any of your favorite medblrs being if med school life were a television show?

md-admissions + randommomentsdevidaimage

ermedicine

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wayfaringmd

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aspiringdoctors

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medicalstate

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baffledinbrooklyn

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And me…

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I love this, I totally agree with all of these

Haha this is perfect! An email one of the professors sent us today: “Ok, so on my way to class this morning I saw a student pop out of a classroom, dance with their toaster, then go back in the classroom. Is it just me or are things getting weird around here?”

April 15, 2014
beautifulbizzzzarreart:

Mizenscen

beautifulbizzzzarreart:

Mizenscen

(via fortheloveofmedicine)

April 14, 2014
"We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too."

— John F Kennedy - Moon Speech at Rice Stadium, 1962

April 13, 2014

Sometimes when I don’t feel like studying, I pretend like I know how to doodle, and pretend that it’s actually studying.

Brachial plexus idea from here.

April 12, 2014
Finals Week - Crush Those Exams

themedicalchronicles:

It’s finals week/hell week and everyone is stressing out about exams and papers. Word of advice: stay positive!

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Looming exams are always frightening, but don’t let that get in the way of motivation. Braving it through thick and thin always makes the end so much sweeter.  (Also, I suggest studying as if your exam will be essay only, not multiple choice - you learn better that way).

Go into the exam knowing you know what you know (does that even make sense?)

Don’t over think on questions. Your gut instinct, and your first choice, is almost always the correct answer (on multiple choice exams).

And when you’re done, you’re done!

There’s no need to brood over what could have been, and should have been. You tried your best and if it didn’t go so well, you can learn from your mistakes. Things can sometimes seem really bad at the moment, but it always gets better. And whatever happens, probably happens for a reason anyway. And now you can relax!

April 12, 2014

Anonymous asked: Hey! I was just curious as to what undergrad class was/is the most helpful in med school?

md-admissions:

Woah, I couldn’t possibly pick one! 

If I had to? I’d say my freshman writing course. My instructor was a philosopher (as in he had a doctorate in philosophy, not a self-proclaimed philosopher) and really challenged us to think about not only what we wrote, but why and how we did. I took those writing skills with me into every class afterwards, and I see it permeating how I write even today. :)

And I know you all are probably groaning and thinking “Ugh tell me about a SCIENCE class that I can take, too!” Well, I’d say statistics. That is very helpful! It provides a basis for learning epidemiology and reading papers, which is…kind of the rest of our lives! 

And bonus! For favorite class? Science and Philosophy. I wrote a final paper on Battlestar Galactica, Star Trek, and Star Wars answering the question “What does it mean to be human” using three different philosophical schools of thought. Because…science fiction counts, right?

Best,

md-a

April 10, 2014
My favorite silly gene names

jtotheizzoe:

On the heels of this post detailing the adorable story of the hedgehog gene, here’s some more of my favorite silly gene names, and the mutant reasons their redonkulous names:

  • tinman - Mutants do not develop a heart (Fruit fly)
  • dreadlocks - Causes photoreceptors to sprout
  • dreadlock-like axon projections (Fruit fly)
  • tribbles - Causes out of control cell division (Fruit fly)
  • maggie - Larvae never mature (Fruit fly)
  • hamlet - Affects a type of sensory cell called “IIB” (Fruit fly)
  • dunce - Affects learning and memory (Fruit fly)
  • smaug - Represses Nanos, which means “dwarf” (Fruit fly)
  • groucho - Excessive bristles on the face (Fruit fly)
  • ken and barbie - Lack of external genitalia (Fruit fly)
  • indy - Stands for “I’m not dead yet”, a la Monty Python (Fruit fly)
  • lush and cheap date - Affect alcohol metabolism (Fruit fly)
  • RING - A protein segment that comes from “really interesting new gene”
  • tigger and pogo - Two families of transposable elements, or pieces of DNA that can jump around genomes (Multiple species)
  • kryptonite and superman - Kryptonite represses superman, which causes extra stamens to form in flowers (Arabadopsis)
  • Yuri gagarin - Protein involved in sensing gravity (Fruit fly)
  • callipyge - Leads to formation of large, round buttocks in sheep (from Greek for “beautiful buttocks”)
  • chablis, frascati, merlot, retsina, riesling, cabernet, grenache, chardonnay, chianti, pinotage, sauternes, weissherbst, zinfandel - A set of genes found to inhibit blood cell formation. Get it? Red and white?! (Zebrafish)

I think these would make an excellent art project, all you artistically-and-scientifically inclined people out there. Any of your favorites that I missed?

I agree. These would be perfect art ideas.

April 9, 2014
"

Olivia, my eldest daughter, caught measles when she was seven years old. As the illness took its usual course I can remember reading to her often in bed and not feeling particularly alarmed about it. Then one morning, when she was well on the road to recovery, I was sitting on her bed showing her how to fashion little animals out of coloured pipe-cleaners, and when it came to her turn to make one herself, I noticed that her fingers and her mind were not working together and she couldn’t do anything.

“Are you feeling all right?” I asked her.

“I feel all sleepy, ” she said.

In an hour, she was unconscious. In twelve hours she was dead.

The measles had turned into a terrible thing called measles encephalitis and there was nothing the doctors could do to save her.

That was twenty-four years ago in 1962, but even now, if a child with measles happens to develop the same deadly reaction from measles as Olivia did, there would still be nothing the doctors could do to help her.

On the other hand, there is today something that parents can do to make sure that this sort of tragedy does not happen to a child of theirs. They can insist that their child is immunised against measles. I was unable to do that for Olivia in 1962 because in those days a reliable measles vaccine had not been discovered. Today a good and safe vaccine is available to every family and all you have to do is to ask your doctor to administer it.

It is not yet generally accepted that measles can be a dangerous illness.

Believe me, it is. In my opinion parents who now refuse to have their children immunised are putting the lives of those children at risk.

In America, where measles immunisation is compulsory, measles like smallpox, has been virtually wiped out.

Here in Britain, because so many parents refuse, either out of obstinacy or ignorance or fear, to allow their children to be immunised, we still have a hundred thousand cases of measles every year.

Out of those, more than 10,000 will suffer side effects of one kind or another.

At least 10,000 will develop ear or chest infections.

About 20 will die.

LET THAT SINK IN.

Every year around 20 children will die in Britain from measles.

So what about the risks that your children will run from being immunised?

They are almost non-existent. Listen to this. In a district of around 300,000 people, there will be only one child every 250 years who will develop serious side effects from measles immunisation! That is about a million to one chance. I should think there would be more chance of your child choking to death on a chocolate bar than of becoming seriously ill from a measles immunisation.

So what on earth are you worrying about?

It really is almost a crime to allow your child to go unimmunised.

"

Roald Dahl, 1986

(via brain-confetti)

TEAM VACCINE

(via watchoutfordinosaurs)

NINETEEN EIGHTY SIX.

roald dahl was calling out the anti-vaccination movement as self indulgent bullshit //thirty god damn years ago//.

(via ultralaser)

Over 1,000 preventable deaths and 128,000 preventable illnesses since 2007 and counting

And this is only in recent history. I can’t imagine the numbers if we had data all the way back to 1986.

(via autistiel)

Word.

(via wayfaringmd)

(via aspiringdoctors)

April 9, 2014
http://randommomentsdevida.tumblr.com/post/82207606130/md-admissions-aspiringdoctors

md-admissions:

md-admissions:

aspiringdoctors:

md-admissions:

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themedicalchronicles replied to your post: irandommomentsdevida replied to your …

Me threeee. Come here and we can have a Medblr dateeeeee and everyone will explode! ;)

MEDBLR DATE AHOY

Count me in. We’ll make the…

I want alllll these things now

Yum, And then we can have some more ice cream! Because you can never have too much ice cream. And opera cakes and cofffeeeee. And we can finally plan our #MedblrMunchieBFFLTravelClub trip abroad!!! :D

April 4, 2014
"Women have always been healers. They were the unlicensed doctors and anatomists. They were abortionists, nurses and counselors. They were the pharmacists, cultivating healing herbs, and exchanging the secrets of their uses. They were midwives, traveling from home to home and village to village. For centuries women were doctors without degrees, barred from books and lectures, learning from each other, and passing on experience from neighbor to neighbor and mother to daughter. They were called “wise women” by the people, witches or charlatans by the authorities. Medicine is part of our heritage as women, our history, our birthright."

Barbara Ehrenreich & Deirdre English, “Witches, Midwives and Nurses: A History of Women” (via cyclicaltangents)

(Source: midwifeinwaiting, via modernathena90)

April 3, 2014
humansofnewyork:

"I’m a pathologist, which means that I run the lab, and I’m continually shocked by all the unnecessary lab work that comes my way. Doctors have to find something wrong with you, because preventative measures aren’t sexy. They know that you’re more likely to appreciate them if they tell you something’s wrong, than if they tell you to stop drinking 40 oz sodas."

humansofnewyork:

"I’m a pathologist, which means that I run the lab, and I’m continually shocked by all the unnecessary lab work that comes my way. Doctors have to find something wrong with you, because preventative measures aren’t sexy. They know that you’re more likely to appreciate them if they tell you something’s wrong, than if they tell you to stop drinking 40 oz sodas."

April 3, 2014

April 2, 2014

i-heart-histo:

A cure for…death

The blood of a unicorn will keep you alive, even if you are an inch from death, but at a terrible price. You have slain something pure and defenseless to save yourself, and you will have but a half-life, a cursed life, from the moment the blood touches your lips.

- Firenze (Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone)

Unicorn blood banks!

Clearly the solution to all of medical science’s unanswered questions.

The mane problem seems to lie in extracting the blood - because finding a decent vein can be a bit hit and myth.

i-heart-histo

Sources:

1. Fairytale Transfusion by quick-brown-fox:  more of John’s work here.

2. Unicorn Blood by Michele Banks aka artologica: visit her Etsy store here.

So i-heart-histo quotes Harry Potter too. And makes Cranquis-style puns. Awesomeness.

March 31, 2014
i-heart-histo:

The Starry Night: Histology Remix
When art imitates life…and life imitates art.
Foreground by Vincent van Gogh
It’s the view he painted from the window of his sanitarium room in the South of France.
Here is the original painting hanging in the MoMA in NYC.

Background by The human ovary
It’s the view you see at 10x magnification when stained with H&E.
Identical. Huh.

i-heart-histo:

The Starry Night: Histology Remix

When art imitates life…and life imitates art.

Foreground by Vincent van Gogh

It’s the view he painted from the window of his sanitarium room in the South of France.

Here is the original painting hanging in the MoMA in NYC.

Background by The human ovary

It’s the view you see at 10x magnification when stained with H&E.

Identical. Huh.

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